On the West Texas trail of dinosaurs

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Standing on the corner in Winslow, Arizona are Jackson Ganter, Bachleor in Science with a major in Geology (Historical) has been working for two years through Undergraduate Reseach Symposium on researching a small dinosaur trackway located in West Texas. He is was in Arizona with Professor Chris Stanley to present presenting his research and our collaborative process to the Council on Undergraduate Research at their yearly conference.

Staff Reports , Staff Writer

The feature photo for this story pictures The University of Texas of the Permian Basin Associate Art Professor Chris Stanley with undergraduate student Jackson Ganter “Standing on the corner in Winslow, Arizona” a nationally-known line from the band, The Eagles’ song “Take it Easy.” However, Ganter and Stanley have done anything but “taking it easy.”
“Over the course of the last two years, Jackson Ganter and I  have led more than 4,500 K-16 students on what we call “The Dinosaur Track Adventure,” Stanley said. “During this activity, we engage the students in a project designed to estimate the leg height of our dinosaur,” Stanley said. Ganter, a Bachelor of Science student with a major in Geology (Historical) has been working for two years with Dr. Rebecca Babcock facilitating a 2017 Undergraduate Research Symposium on analyzing a small dinosaur trackway located in West Texas.  “Over the course of the last two years Jackson and I have led more than 4,500 K-16 students on what we call ‘The Dinosaur Track Adventure,’ Stanley said. “During the activity, we engage the students in a project designed to estimate the leg height of our dinosaur.”
Last week Ganter and Dr. Stanley presented Ganter’s research and their collaborative process to the Council on Undergraduate Research at their yearly conference, according to Stanley. We would like to thank

“We would like to thank former President Dr. W. David Watts who made the initial contacts with the University of Texas System which granted us the permissions to engage in this work,” Stanley said, while offering “a hearty shout out” to Dr Warren Koepp, Dr. Robert Perry, Mr. Jake Weigel, Edmund Perry, “and a host of other dinosaur enthusiasts who have helped us along the way!” Students have traveled to the Girvin locality near Pecos, Texas off of Hwy. 385 to view Cretaceous-aged (about 120 million years dinosaur footprinted. The tracks have been interpreted as being made by a plant-eating dinosaur, an omithodpod called Camptosaurus.

Student Jackson Ganter and Dr. Chris Stanley prepare to present their collaborative research on dinosaur tracks discovered in West Texas.